My Adopted Puppy by Hazel Hynek

hazel hynek adopted baby from Ark johannesburg puppy shelter - tyson3

A lovely story from one of our Ark parents and their journey of adopting a rescued puppy 🙂 

In Febuary of this year my dear uncle Ken, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. They determined it was terminal and that he had, had very little time left. In the March, the love of my life and baby girl, Dalmation, Sidney, was poisened and unfortunately did not make it. Although we still had two amazingly beautiful doggies, Queenie and Trixie, I didn’t have MY doggy sleeping next to me anymore.

By June, I decided I NEEEEDED a puppy. After BEGGING my mom for 3 months solid, eventually she decided we could get ONE puppy. She thought it might help bring some positive energy into our home.

In August we adopted my baby boy, Tyson and after seeing her naughty boy ,Eddy, my mom couldn’t resist taking him home too.

These two puppies helped so much in creating such beautiful memories with my uncle Ken. He was constantly giggling at their little antics and they both loved him dearly. Uncle Ken passed away 29/10/2013. Uncle Ken lived with us, throughout the remainder of his days. Eddy was by his side even in the last few days of his life.

I just wanted to take a second of my day to share with you all, just how wonderful this organization, the Ark Animal Centre is and just how much impact they have in our every day lives. They give you, not just a puppy or two, but rather, a beautiful bundle of joy and abundant love.

You helped bring a bit of light into our home, when I didn’t think it possible. On behalf of uncle Ken and the rest of the Hynek family, I just want to say thank you!!!

Adopt today guys. It was the best decision we’ve ever made! 

Written by: Hazel Hynek

Coco the Cleft Palate Jack Russell’s Happy Ending

coco cleft palate puppy posing copy

My name is Coco and I’m a cleft palate pup that would like to share my story with you

I was born on 6th March 2011 along with my brothers and sisters.  For reasons only later revealed my mom wasn’t able to feed me and rejected me. Her owners brought me to my new family when I was a day old and that’s been my home ever since.

jack russell puppy cleft palate

I was hand reared with a bottle and Milk-o-pup formula and always battled to suckle properly, often the milk would come out my nose.  I was fed every 2 hours but only managed a measly 2 – 5ml at a time.

At 5 weeks my new mommy introduced me to soft puppy food but that didn’t work out at all, everything came out my nose.  They thought I might have a cold and took me to the vet who informed them that I in fact had a cleft palate and it would probably be best if I was put down.

My new family was heartbroken after doing such a great job with me for 5 weeks and headed home, straight onto Google, and there they found out all the info they would need to keep me alive.

jack russell puppy cleft palate

I was given water from a hamster bottle on a stand as I needed to drink upright so the liquids didn’t go into my lungs.  As I got older I only eat dry doggy food and drink water, mom treats me with cut up Vienna’s too.

jack russell puppy cleft palate

For Easter 2011 my family and I were heading to Badplaas with their caravan and were involved in a terrible accident, with a truck, fortunately we were all ok but the van and car were write offs.  Every-one was so concerned about me (I was 6 weeks old) but I was none the worse for wear.

jack russell puppy cleft palate car caravan accident

That year my family moved and one day, just for a split second, the gate was left open and I decided to go for a walk.  I got rather confused about where I was and got lost.  The family was frantic; half the neighborhood was out looking for me.  Luckily they found me and now I have a collar with my name and number, just in case.

jack russell puppy cleft palate

One day we went to visit family and I was playing in the garden with their dog when all of a sudden I couldn’t breathe! It was awful! My throat closed up and I was turning blue. My mom was blowing down my nose and throat thinking I choked on something or was stung by a bee.  I was rushed to the vet who put me in an oxygen tank for the night; it was so scary to be alone! I’ve never spent a night without mom, her bed is my bed and she’s not here. We don’t know what caused the attack and every now and then if I get too excited it happens again, not that bad though and I don’t go to the vet, mom calms me down on her bed then I’m fine.

As far as my diet goes I only eat dry, solid food and drink water.  Every now and then I still have water running out my nose but I’m otherwise 100% Jack Russell.  I love riding in the car, teddy’s (emptying them is so much fun) but my rope is my favorite toy and Google is my best friend as without it, I probably wouldn’t be here.

Written by: Coco & her mom, Vionne Kruger

A guide to understanding vaccinations for your dog

:: PROTECTION AND PREVENTION ::

Vaccinations are one of the most important preventive measures you can take for the health of your dog. Vaccinations help protect your dog from viral and bacterial diseases. At sometime in its life, your dog may be exposed to a serious or even fatal infectious disease. Without proper vaccination, it is left unprotected.

Whether your dog spends more time indoors than outdoors, he may be at risk of exposure to infectious diseases. Fortunately for your dog, vaccination to prevent many of these diseases is available through your veterinarian. Vaccinating your dog is the best and least costly way of preventing infectious disease. Prevention helps assure the best quality of life for your dog and is much less costly than treating your dog for a serious illness that could have been prevented.

:: HOW OFTEN SHOULD MY DOG BE VACCINATED? ::

The number and frequency of vaccinations your dog needs can be determined during a routine examination by your veterinarian. Your veterinarian takes several factors into consideration when making the decision, such as your dog’s lifestyle, lifestage and risk of exposure.

A general rule is puppies are to be vaccinated 3 times. First vaccination is between 4 -6 weeks of age, and thereafter another 2, one month apart.  Rabies vaccine is administered at 3 months of age. Thereafter, all dogs should be vaccinated yearly.

Adult rescue dogs are vaccinated twice, this is normally sufficient to prevent your dog contracting any diseases.

:: WHAT POSSIBLE RISKS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH VACCINATIONS? ::

Severe reactions to vaccinations are very uncommon. Your dog is at a higher risk of contracting an infectious disease than of experiencing side effects from a vaccination.